The fruits of my labor

The fruits of my labor

The fruits of my labor 1

The fruits of my labor 2

The fruits of my labor 3

The fruits of my labor 4

The fruits of my labor 5

The fruits of my labor 6

Two days of chopping, stirring, baking and cleaning later, we now have:
1 large bag of dried apples (which will likely be polished off by Sunday night)
2 jars of blueberry syrup for pancakes
3 containers of my favorite, creamy, comfort food potato soup
4 breakfasts worth of pancakes in the freezer
5 large jars of delicious yogurt
6 days left until I need to bake bread again (this is probably only hopeful thinking)
7 happy mouths to serve vanilla custard to tomorrow night (the last item on my list I still have to make)
8 apple cinnamon muffins left as we speak
and 9, the hours of sleep I hope to get tonight. πŸ™‚

But it was so worth it.

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12 Comments

  1. Just wondering: Do you have 2 fridges?
    I couldn’t fit all that in my little bit of a fridge…. and my freezer is even smaller. I love the idea of cooking once a week [which you almost have here] but how do I store all that?

  2. Laura, I’ll post the recipe later today. πŸ™‚

    Mab, I only have one fridge. However, it is currently a very, very full fridge. I do also have a separate deep freezer, which helps a lot with making extra food. A deep freeze is such a great investment, for being able to take advantage of deals. You can often even get them free, through things like freecycle, craig’s list, and spring cleaning, when people put stuff they don’t want out on the side of the road (that’s where we got our first and second freezer!).

    Bonnie, to make dried apples you need to have a dehydrator. All you do is peel and cut them up (it’s nicest to core and slice them in rounds, but it’s difficult to core apples when they are getting older and fall apart more easily- I just cut these ones into smaller slices). Then spread them on the dehydrator sheets, put them on a low temperature (around 95 degrees) for around 4-8 hours (depending on your slice thickness and size). That’s it!

    Tara, the pancakes are for quick breakfasts. I realized that this worked well after making too many pancakes once and freezing them and just loving the convenience of having them. They’re not quite as nice as freshly made pancakes, but they work when you need something fast. We use our toaster oven to reheat them.

  3. Great job!

    Can I ask how you made so much yogurt in one night? I have a yogurt maker but it only makes 32 oz at a time.

    ~Stacy

  4. How do you make your blueberry pancake syrup? It looks so yummy. You have really inspired me to try and cook things from scratch. I am really enjoying your site. Also, that potato soup looks really yummy. I am going to have to make that one sometime soon.

  5. Could you share your recipe for bread? I am just starting to make homemade bread and I thought it would be interesting to try spelt bread. I had never heard of spelt before reading about it on here.

  6. Angela, I’ll post my spelt bread recipe soon!

    As for the blueberry syrup, what I made was loosely based on this recipe from Tammy’s Recipes:
    http://www.tammysrecipes.com/strawberry_sauce

    I used honey instead of white sugar, and a bit of flour because I didn’t have corn starch (tapioca or arrowroot powders would have worked well, too). It was so, so easy. I’m eager to make and freeze another big batch!

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